Hair loss​

Alopecia is a term for hair loss of any kind. There are many types and causes of hair loss (Alopecia), most of which can be effectively treated. Hair loss may be genetically inherited, or it may be caused by a variety of other factors including protein or other dietary deficiency, hormonal imbalance, and stress. Hair loss can also be the first sign of an otherwise undiagnosed or undetected underlying illness.

Alopecia

Alopecia is hair loss or balding. It may happen on any part of the body. There are many types of alopecia. Some types cause temporary hair loss and your hair will grow back. With other types, hair loss can get worse, and become permanent.

Hair loss & Iron Deficiency

Low Iron and Hair Loss. One of the least known causes of hair loss is low iron. You do not have to be anemic to lose your hair. Your doctor may advise you that your iron levels are normal, but we know that low normal levels of iron will cause significant hair loss.

Hair Loss & Thyroid

Hair loss is another sign that thyroid hormones may be out of balance. Both hypothyroidism

and hyperthyroidism

can cause hair to fall out. In most cases, the hair will grow back once the thyroid disorder is treated.

Androgenic Alopecia

The majority of women with androgenetic - also called androgenic - alopecia have diffuse thinning on all areas of the scalp. (Men rarely have diffuse thinning but instead have more distinct patterns of baldness.) Some women have a combination of two pattern types.

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Scarring Alopecia

Scarring hair loss, also known as cicatricial alopecia, is the loss of hair which is accompanied with scarring. This is in contrast to non scarring hair loss. It can be caused by a diverse group of rare disorders that destroy the hair follicle, replace it with scar tissue, and cause permanent hair loss. A variety of distributions are possible. In some cases, hair loss is gradual, without symptoms, and is unnoticed for long periods. In other cases, hair loss is associated with severe itching, burning and pain and is rapidly progressive. The inflammation that destroys the follicle is below the skin surface and there is usually no "scar" seen on the scalp. Affected areas of the scalp may show little signs of inflammation, or have redness, scaling, increased or decreased pigmentation, pustules, or draining sinuses. Scarring hair loss occurs in otherwise healthy men and women of all ages and is seen worldwide.

Chemical Damage Hairloss

Hair loss from chemical trauma is possible where the follicles become sufficiently damaged by these chemicals that they cause burns to the scalp. When these chemical burns are severe enough to harm the follicles but not cause permanent scarring, the result is chemical trauma and hair loss treatment is often possible. Should the burns be more extreme, however, causing scarring to the scalp, this is defined as cicatricial alopecia which is generally only treatable through surgical hair restoration.

Traction Alopecia

The term alopecia refers to hair loss. Traction alopecia is hair loss that’s caused by repeatedly pulling on your hair. You can develop this condition if you often wear your hair in a tight ponytail, bun, or braids, especially if you use chemicals or heat on your hair.

Traction alopecia can be reversed if you stop pulling your hair back. But if you don’t intervene soon enough, the hair loss may be permanent.

Doctors in Greenland first identified the condition in the early 1900s. They discovered that women who wore tight ponytails had lost hair along their hairline.

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Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata, also known as spot baldness, is a condition in which hair is lost from some or all areas of the body. Often it results in a few bald spots on the scalp, each about the size of a coin. Psychological stress may result. People are generally otherwise healthy. In a few, all the hair on the scalp or all body hair is lost and loss can be permanent.

Alopecia areata is believed to be an autoimmune disease resulting from a breach in the immune privilege of the hair follicles. Risk factors include a family history of the condition. Among identical twins if one is affected the other has about a 50% chance of also being affected.The underlying mechanism involves failure by the body to recognize its own cells with subsequent immune mediated destruction of the hair follicle.